Tin Roof Ice Cream

It’s March, so I can start churning out the ice cream full time, right? Right? Okay, so maybe it’s not quite ice cream whether for most of us yet. Here in Utah we’re about to enter the most bipolar season of them all. It’s hot, it’s cold, it’s sunny, it’s snowy. It’s enough to drive any person mad. So in a few weeks don’t be surprised if everything on twitter goes all caps.

But back to ice cream.

For me, ice cream is one of those treats that can turn any bad day upside down. There’s nothing that a little ice cream can’t cure, even if only temporarily.


My list of cookbooks I’d like to own is long, though my husband does his best to shorten it. Last Christmas I think I outright demanded that he get me The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz. He did and I squealed with delight during my first flip through it. It’s an absolutely must-have for any lover of ice cream making and devouring.

I wanted to make literally every recipe in that book. And for some reason, I chose Tin Roof as the first one to try. It isn’t the most exotic flavor, nor is it anything fancy or complex. It’s just vanilla ice cream with swirls of chocolate and chunks of chocolate covered peanuts.

Just vanilla ice cream with swirls of chocolate and chunks of chocolate covered peanuts? Who could ask for anything more? It’s creamy, chocolaty, and has a good peanutty crunch. It’s all this girl needs. And there’s something about this flavor that reminds me of being a kid. Of hot summer afternoons where more ice cream melts down my cheeks and hands than actually ends up in my mouth.

This tin roof ice cream is youthful summertime in a bowl, which helps me feel better about the snow coming down outside.


Tin Roof Ice Cream
From The Perfect Scoop
Makes approximately 1 quart

3/4 cup whole milk
3/4 cup sugar
Pinch of salt
1 1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 vanilla bean
4 large egg yolks
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 cup chocolate covered peanuts, chopped
Fudge ripple (recipe follows)

Warm the milk, sugar, salt, and 1/2 cup of the cream in a medium saucepan. With a paring knife, scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean and put them in the hot milk mixture. Cover, remove from heat, and let steep for 30 minutes.

Rewarm the milk mixture. Pour the remaining 1 cup of heavy cream into a large bowl with a mesh strainer set on top. In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg yolks. Slowly pour the hot milk mixture into the egg yolks, whisking constantly. Return the mixture to the saucepan and stir with a rubber spatula until thickened and the mixture coats the back of a spoon. Pour the custard through the strainer to remove the vanilla bean and any egg bits into the large bowl. Chill thoroughly in the refrigerator. Prepare the fudge ripple.

Fudge Ripple

1/4 cup sugar
2 1/2 tablespoons corn syrup
1/4 cup water
3 tablespoons unsweetened dutch-process cocoa
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Whisk together the sugar, corn syrup, water, and cocoa powder in a medium saucepan. Heat over medium heat, whisking constantly until the mixture comes to a boil. Cook for 1 minute, whisking frequently. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla. Chill in the refrigerator completely.

Freeze the ice cream according to manufacturers directions. In a medium bowl, carefully fold the prepared ice cream with the fudge ripple and layer with the chocolate covered peanuts. Avoid stirring them all together or you will lose the ripple and end up with chocolate ice cream. Freeze for at least 2 hours to harden before serving.