How to separate eggs

How to separate eggs (with a video!) from completelydelicious.com

Here’s how I separate my eggs when I have a recipe that requires separate egg yolks or egg whites, or both. While there are a few ways to get the job done, this is the one that works best for me.

The three bowl method

To get started, you’ll need 3 bowls—

1) One to collect the egg whites as you separate each egg
2) One for all of the separated egg yolks
3) One for all of the separated egg whites

Having 3 bowls means that if an egg yolk breaks while you’re separating it from the egg white it won’t contaminate a whole bowl of separated egg whites. Egg whites won’t beat properly if there is any fat (such as from a yolk) present. Better safe than sorry!

Let’s separate

First, crack your egg.

How to separate eggs (with a video!) from completelydelicious.com

Then open up the egg over bowl #1. Some of the egg whites will drop immediately into the bowl.

How to separate eggs (with a video!) from completelydelicious.com

Gently dump the egg into your hand and let the rest of the egg white fall through your fingers into the bowl.

How to separate eggs (with a video!) from completelydelicious.com

Gently place the egg yolk into bowl #2.

How to separate eggs (with a video!) from completelydelicious.com

Then pour the egg white into bowl #3.

How to separate eggs (with a video!) from completelydelicious.com

To see it all put together in real time, here’s a quick little video:

A few tips

> Eggs separate better when they are cold. If your recipe calls for yolks or whites at room temperature, separate them first, then let them sit.

> Older eggs will separate more easily than fresh eggs.

> Separated eggs can be stored for later use. In a covered container, yolks and whites will keep in the fridge for several days. Egg whites will also keep in the freezer for up to several months.

How to separate eggs (with a video!) from completelydelicious.com